28 Mar Your Housing Options after Divorce Just improved

Major banks in Canada recently announced a reduction to their fixed rate mortgages. It seems bank executives are more confident about the housing market and the likelihood of a major correction in housing prices.

This should provide good news for people who are separating and making decisions of how they split their assets, in particular, the matrimonial home. For many, keeping the house is important for couples with children and keeping a stable environment for them. For older couples, whether they choose to buy a partner out and remain in the matrimonial home or sell and each purchase a new home, lower interest rates allow for more flexibility when it comes to possible settlement options.

Managing two households costs more than maintaining one household. With late in life divorce, retirement plans are greatly affected by housing costs.

Many people finance equalization payments owing to spouses through refinancing existing mortgages, so lower mortgage rates in those situation helps.

If selling the matrimonial home is part of a settlement plan, lower mortgage rates make home buying more attractive. If keeping the matrimonial home is an option, managing cash flow is easier with lower monthly mortgage payments.

The home you want to keep or the home you want to buy after divorce may
now be a real possibility.

11 Dec Dividing Property in Divorce

ID-10071842Deciding how to split assets is more than just dividing the values on paper.  People often make the mistake of believing that dividing everything in half is the simplest and fairest way of handling things.  This is not necessarily true.  People need to pay attention to the decisions they make about dividing property and consider the long term consequences.

Assets differ in a number of ways.  Some are liquid like cash.  Some assets like RRSP accounts are tax deferred.  Some assets need to be valued in a specific manner according to family law rules and regulations.  Investments may have a different value after taking into account possible capital gains taxes.

Sometimes assets have an emotional connection that may have more worth than the actual dollar value such as a house, business, or family heirloom.

Assets may have costs to consider.  A couple may have a $400,000 investment  account and a house worth $400,000 (mortgage free).  The assumption is that if one spouse takes the house and the other takes the cash, this results in an equal division.  Keeping the house has costs such as property taxes and upkeep and maintenance. The investment account will be growing over time earning interest. It may not seem quite the equal split over a period of time.

Debts are also part of the division of marital property.  Allocating debts in divorce may mean paying them off, refinancing, or applying for new debt.  Different types of debt carry different fees, charge, penalties and terms.   Just because you have $10,000 left on your car loan and $10,000 credit card debt doesn’t mean that the car loan should go to one spouse while the credit card debt goes to the other.

Divorce settlements are often agreed upon with limited insight into the long-term consequences.  As a result, settlements that seem to be fair and workable initially do not necessarily stand the test of time.  Therefore, it is highly recommended that a divorce financial planner be brought into the process so that you can see how decisions you make today will affect the rest of your life.

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

10 Aug Launch of Eva’s RoundTable

Looking for investment advice for your equalization payment… Selling the marital home and looking to downsize… not sure if the kids emerged unscarred post-divorce.
During and after divorce, women need trusted resources to advise on their specific situation, perhaps a mediator, family therapist, realtor, life coach, investment advisor, or mortgage professional.
I have launched EVA’S ROUNDTABLE a directory of professionals who can advise women facing separation/divorce.
Eva’s Roundtable is here to help you connect with professionals that are pre-screened and referred through Women in Divorce Financial. Each one provides a specific area of expertise, and understands the value of working together.

Click here to view Eva’s Roundtable

07 Jul Facing divorce. . .Should I sell the house now?

It was reported yesterday that home sales in the Greater Toronto Area have rebounded in a big way after a brutal slump, increasing nearly 30 per cent since last June and heralding the return of a seller’s market. What does that mean to you if you’re someone facing divorce today?  Should you consider selling quickly to take advantage of the market now?  Some people believe they should sell now and split the money and each buy something  on their own before prices climb even further.  

Many people are carrying large debt loads and are shocked to see how much they in fact have left over  after paying off all their debts.  In calculating the cost of a new home, you must take into account such things as legal fees, moving costs, utility set up fees.

The big expense  for buyers,however,  is land transfer tax.  And if you  considering buying in the GTA, there is an additional land transfer tax assessed.  Most realtors and mortgage brokers websites have a land transfer tax calculator. If you can’t  locate one easily, let me know and I’ll do the  calculation for you.